Staci'story



Staci'story
+
nubbsgalore:

six year old anita and twelve year old sonia, sisters, were both born blind to parents who, as field labourers making less than a dollar a day, were unable to afford the 300 dollar, fifteen minute operation that would restore their sight. 
for such children, blindness is often a death sentence. unable to read or find work, most leave their villages to spend their lives homeless, asking for money in the streets (much like with this photo). 
but with the help of 20/20/20, a non profit which seeks to provide the surgery for the approximately twenty million in need, sonia and anita were successfully treated, with their defective opaque lenses replaced with functional artificial ones. 
said anita’s mother, “when they removed the bandages, she kept saying ‘mother, i can see! i can see!’” as 20/20/20 explains, “it is an amazing experience to watch a child open their eyes and see for the first time. some gasp, some cry. some are too stunned to do anything except look around them and take it all in.”
you can watch a short, but impactful, documentary on anita and sonia, which includes the touching footage of the sisters seeing for the first time. photos from a larger series by brent stirton. click picture for more on their story from said doc. (see also: india’s dalits)
nubbsgalore:

six year old anita and twelve year old sonia, sisters, were both born blind to parents who, as field labourers making less than a dollar a day, were unable to afford the 300 dollar, fifteen minute operation that would restore their sight. 
for such children, blindness is often a death sentence. unable to read or find work, most leave their villages to spend their lives homeless, asking for money in the streets (much like with this photo). 
but with the help of 20/20/20, a non profit which seeks to provide the surgery for the approximately twenty million in need, sonia and anita were successfully treated, with their defective opaque lenses replaced with functional artificial ones. 
said anita’s mother, “when they removed the bandages, she kept saying ‘mother, i can see! i can see!’” as 20/20/20 explains, “it is an amazing experience to watch a child open their eyes and see for the first time. some gasp, some cry. some are too stunned to do anything except look around them and take it all in.”
you can watch a short, but impactful, documentary on anita and sonia, which includes the touching footage of the sisters seeing for the first time. photos from a larger series by brent stirton. click picture for more on their story from said doc. (see also: india’s dalits)
nubbsgalore:

six year old anita and twelve year old sonia, sisters, were both born blind to parents who, as field labourers making less than a dollar a day, were unable to afford the 300 dollar, fifteen minute operation that would restore their sight. 
for such children, blindness is often a death sentence. unable to read or find work, most leave their villages to spend their lives homeless, asking for money in the streets (much like with this photo). 
but with the help of 20/20/20, a non profit which seeks to provide the surgery for the approximately twenty million in need, sonia and anita were successfully treated, with their defective opaque lenses replaced with functional artificial ones. 
said anita’s mother, “when they removed the bandages, she kept saying ‘mother, i can see! i can see!’” as 20/20/20 explains, “it is an amazing experience to watch a child open their eyes and see for the first time. some gasp, some cry. some are too stunned to do anything except look around them and take it all in.”
you can watch a short, but impactful, documentary on anita and sonia, which includes the touching footage of the sisters seeing for the first time. photos from a larger series by brent stirton. click picture for more on their story from said doc. (see also: india’s dalits)
nubbsgalore:

six year old anita and twelve year old sonia, sisters, were both born blind to parents who, as field labourers making less than a dollar a day, were unable to afford the 300 dollar, fifteen minute operation that would restore their sight. 
for such children, blindness is often a death sentence. unable to read or find work, most leave their villages to spend their lives homeless, asking for money in the streets (much like with this photo). 
but with the help of 20/20/20, a non profit which seeks to provide the surgery for the approximately twenty million in need, sonia and anita were successfully treated, with their defective opaque lenses replaced with functional artificial ones. 
said anita’s mother, “when they removed the bandages, she kept saying ‘mother, i can see! i can see!’” as 20/20/20 explains, “it is an amazing experience to watch a child open their eyes and see for the first time. some gasp, some cry. some are too stunned to do anything except look around them and take it all in.”
you can watch a short, but impactful, documentary on anita and sonia, which includes the touching footage of the sisters seeing for the first time. photos from a larger series by brent stirton. click picture for more on their story from said doc. (see also: india’s dalits)
nubbsgalore:

six year old anita and twelve year old sonia, sisters, were both born blind to parents who, as field labourers making less than a dollar a day, were unable to afford the 300 dollar, fifteen minute operation that would restore their sight. 
for such children, blindness is often a death sentence. unable to read or find work, most leave their villages to spend their lives homeless, asking for money in the streets (much like with this photo). 
but with the help of 20/20/20, a non profit which seeks to provide the surgery for the approximately twenty million in need, sonia and anita were successfully treated, with their defective opaque lenses replaced with functional artificial ones. 
said anita’s mother, “when they removed the bandages, she kept saying ‘mother, i can see! i can see!’” as 20/20/20 explains, “it is an amazing experience to watch a child open their eyes and see for the first time. some gasp, some cry. some are too stunned to do anything except look around them and take it all in.”
you can watch a short, but impactful, documentary on anita and sonia, which includes the touching footage of the sisters seeing for the first time. photos from a larger series by brent stirton. click picture for more on their story from said doc. (see also: india’s dalits)
nubbsgalore:

six year old anita and twelve year old sonia, sisters, were both born blind to parents who, as field labourers making less than a dollar a day, were unable to afford the 300 dollar, fifteen minute operation that would restore their sight. 
for such children, blindness is often a death sentence. unable to read or find work, most leave their villages to spend their lives homeless, asking for money in the streets (much like with this photo). 
but with the help of 20/20/20, a non profit which seeks to provide the surgery for the approximately twenty million in need, sonia and anita were successfully treated, with their defective opaque lenses replaced with functional artificial ones. 
said anita’s mother, “when they removed the bandages, she kept saying ‘mother, i can see! i can see!’” as 20/20/20 explains, “it is an amazing experience to watch a child open their eyes and see for the first time. some gasp, some cry. some are too stunned to do anything except look around them and take it all in.”
you can watch a short, but impactful, documentary on anita and sonia, which includes the touching footage of the sisters seeing for the first time. photos from a larger series by brent stirton. click picture for more on their story from said doc. (see also: india’s dalits)
nubbsgalore:

six year old anita and twelve year old sonia, sisters, were both born blind to parents who, as field labourers making less than a dollar a day, were unable to afford the 300 dollar, fifteen minute operation that would restore their sight. 
for such children, blindness is often a death sentence. unable to read or find work, most leave their villages to spend their lives homeless, asking for money in the streets (much like with this photo). 
but with the help of 20/20/20, a non profit which seeks to provide the surgery for the approximately twenty million in need, sonia and anita were successfully treated, with their defective opaque lenses replaced with functional artificial ones. 
said anita’s mother, “when they removed the bandages, she kept saying ‘mother, i can see! i can see!’” as 20/20/20 explains, “it is an amazing experience to watch a child open their eyes and see for the first time. some gasp, some cry. some are too stunned to do anything except look around them and take it all in.”
you can watch a short, but impactful, documentary on anita and sonia, which includes the touching footage of the sisters seeing for the first time. photos from a larger series by brent stirton. click picture for more on their story from said doc. (see also: india’s dalits)
nubbsgalore:

six year old anita and twelve year old sonia, sisters, were both born blind to parents who, as field labourers making less than a dollar a day, were unable to afford the 300 dollar, fifteen minute operation that would restore their sight. 
for such children, blindness is often a death sentence. unable to read or find work, most leave their villages to spend their lives homeless, asking for money in the streets (much like with this photo). 
but with the help of 20/20/20, a non profit which seeks to provide the surgery for the approximately twenty million in need, sonia and anita were successfully treated, with their defective opaque lenses replaced with functional artificial ones. 
said anita’s mother, “when they removed the bandages, she kept saying ‘mother, i can see! i can see!’” as 20/20/20 explains, “it is an amazing experience to watch a child open their eyes and see for the first time. some gasp, some cry. some are too stunned to do anything except look around them and take it all in.”
you can watch a short, but impactful, documentary on anita and sonia, which includes the touching footage of the sisters seeing for the first time. photos from a larger series by brent stirton. click picture for more on their story from said doc. (see also: india’s dalits)
nubbsgalore:

six year old anita and twelve year old sonia, sisters, were both born blind to parents who, as field labourers making less than a dollar a day, were unable to afford the 300 dollar, fifteen minute operation that would restore their sight. 
for such children, blindness is often a death sentence. unable to read or find work, most leave their villages to spend their lives homeless, asking for money in the streets (much like with this photo). 
but with the help of 20/20/20, a non profit which seeks to provide the surgery for the approximately twenty million in need, sonia and anita were successfully treated, with their defective opaque lenses replaced with functional artificial ones. 
said anita’s mother, “when they removed the bandages, she kept saying ‘mother, i can see! i can see!’” as 20/20/20 explains, “it is an amazing experience to watch a child open their eyes and see for the first time. some gasp, some cry. some are too stunned to do anything except look around them and take it all in.”
you can watch a short, but impactful, documentary on anita and sonia, which includes the touching footage of the sisters seeing for the first time. photos from a larger series by brent stirton. click picture for more on their story from said doc. (see also: india’s dalits)
nubbsgalore:

six year old anita and twelve year old sonia, sisters, were both born blind to parents who, as field labourers making less than a dollar a day, were unable to afford the 300 dollar, fifteen minute operation that would restore their sight. 
for such children, blindness is often a death sentence. unable to read or find work, most leave their villages to spend their lives homeless, asking for money in the streets (much like with this photo). 
but with the help of 20/20/20, a non profit which seeks to provide the surgery for the approximately twenty million in need, sonia and anita were successfully treated, with their defective opaque lenses replaced with functional artificial ones. 
said anita’s mother, “when they removed the bandages, she kept saying ‘mother, i can see! i can see!’” as 20/20/20 explains, “it is an amazing experience to watch a child open their eyes and see for the first time. some gasp, some cry. some are too stunned to do anything except look around them and take it all in.”
you can watch a short, but impactful, documentary on anita and sonia, which includes the touching footage of the sisters seeing for the first time. photos from a larger series by brent stirton. click picture for more on their story from said doc. (see also: india’s dalits)
+
fredsavageiii:

this whole exchange was golden
fredsavageiii:

this whole exchange was golden
fredsavageiii:

this whole exchange was golden
fredsavageiii:

this whole exchange was golden
fredsavageiii:

this whole exchange was golden
fredsavageiii:

this whole exchange was golden
fredsavageiii:

this whole exchange was golden
fredsavageiii:

this whole exchange was golden
+
+
bobbycaputo:

Gaza Artist Turns Israeli Air Strike Smoke into Powerful Sketches
As the world looks on with horror at the growing civilian toll in Gaza, and Hamas and Israel consider the terms of a U.S.-proposed ceasefire, one young Palestinian architect is responding to the crisis through art. Gaza-based Tawfik Gebreel aims to send a message, in the “universal humanitarian language understood by all peoples of the world.” He is using photos of the smoke thrown up by rocket strikes and reworking the images with symbols of hope and unity.
bobbycaputo:

Gaza Artist Turns Israeli Air Strike Smoke into Powerful Sketches
As the world looks on with horror at the growing civilian toll in Gaza, and Hamas and Israel consider the terms of a U.S.-proposed ceasefire, one young Palestinian architect is responding to the crisis through art. Gaza-based Tawfik Gebreel aims to send a message, in the “universal humanitarian language understood by all peoples of the world.” He is using photos of the smoke thrown up by rocket strikes and reworking the images with symbols of hope and unity.
bobbycaputo:

Gaza Artist Turns Israeli Air Strike Smoke into Powerful Sketches
As the world looks on with horror at the growing civilian toll in Gaza, and Hamas and Israel consider the terms of a U.S.-proposed ceasefire, one young Palestinian architect is responding to the crisis through art. Gaza-based Tawfik Gebreel aims to send a message, in the “universal humanitarian language understood by all peoples of the world.” He is using photos of the smoke thrown up by rocket strikes and reworking the images with symbols of hope and unity.
bobbycaputo:

Gaza Artist Turns Israeli Air Strike Smoke into Powerful Sketches
As the world looks on with horror at the growing civilian toll in Gaza, and Hamas and Israel consider the terms of a U.S.-proposed ceasefire, one young Palestinian architect is responding to the crisis through art. Gaza-based Tawfik Gebreel aims to send a message, in the “universal humanitarian language understood by all peoples of the world.” He is using photos of the smoke thrown up by rocket strikes and reworking the images with symbols of hope and unity.
bobbycaputo:

Gaza Artist Turns Israeli Air Strike Smoke into Powerful Sketches
As the world looks on with horror at the growing civilian toll in Gaza, and Hamas and Israel consider the terms of a U.S.-proposed ceasefire, one young Palestinian architect is responding to the crisis through art. Gaza-based Tawfik Gebreel aims to send a message, in the “universal humanitarian language understood by all peoples of the world.” He is using photos of the smoke thrown up by rocket strikes and reworking the images with symbols of hope and unity.
bobbycaputo:

Gaza Artist Turns Israeli Air Strike Smoke into Powerful Sketches
As the world looks on with horror at the growing civilian toll in Gaza, and Hamas and Israel consider the terms of a U.S.-proposed ceasefire, one young Palestinian architect is responding to the crisis through art. Gaza-based Tawfik Gebreel aims to send a message, in the “universal humanitarian language understood by all peoples of the world.” He is using photos of the smoke thrown up by rocket strikes and reworking the images with symbols of hope and unity.
bobbycaputo:

Gaza Artist Turns Israeli Air Strike Smoke into Powerful Sketches
As the world looks on with horror at the growing civilian toll in Gaza, and Hamas and Israel consider the terms of a U.S.-proposed ceasefire, one young Palestinian architect is responding to the crisis through art. Gaza-based Tawfik Gebreel aims to send a message, in the “universal humanitarian language understood by all peoples of the world.” He is using photos of the smoke thrown up by rocket strikes and reworking the images with symbols of hope and unity.
bobbycaputo:

Gaza Artist Turns Israeli Air Strike Smoke into Powerful Sketches
As the world looks on with horror at the growing civilian toll in Gaza, and Hamas and Israel consider the terms of a U.S.-proposed ceasefire, one young Palestinian architect is responding to the crisis through art. Gaza-based Tawfik Gebreel aims to send a message, in the “universal humanitarian language understood by all peoples of the world.” He is using photos of the smoke thrown up by rocket strikes and reworking the images with symbols of hope and unity.
bobbycaputo:

Gaza Artist Turns Israeli Air Strike Smoke into Powerful Sketches
As the world looks on with horror at the growing civilian toll in Gaza, and Hamas and Israel consider the terms of a U.S.-proposed ceasefire, one young Palestinian architect is responding to the crisis through art. Gaza-based Tawfik Gebreel aims to send a message, in the “universal humanitarian language understood by all peoples of the world.” He is using photos of the smoke thrown up by rocket strikes and reworking the images with symbols of hope and unity.
bobbycaputo:

Gaza Artist Turns Israeli Air Strike Smoke into Powerful Sketches
As the world looks on with horror at the growing civilian toll in Gaza, and Hamas and Israel consider the terms of a U.S.-proposed ceasefire, one young Palestinian architect is responding to the crisis through art. Gaza-based Tawfik Gebreel aims to send a message, in the “universal humanitarian language understood by all peoples of the world.” He is using photos of the smoke thrown up by rocket strikes and reworking the images with symbols of hope and unity.
+
bloodybrilliantbooks:

After a year I’ve finally completed this collection of Harry Potter books. My mum can’t understand why I want two copies of each book but these editions were just too pretty to refuse. I love the effort than has gone into designing these covers and the little details in them. This is how book covers should look!
bloodybrilliantbooks:

After a year I’ve finally completed this collection of Harry Potter books. My mum can’t understand why I want two copies of each book but these editions were just too pretty to refuse. I love the effort than has gone into designing these covers and the little details in them. This is how book covers should look!
bloodybrilliantbooks:

After a year I’ve finally completed this collection of Harry Potter books. My mum can’t understand why I want two copies of each book but these editions were just too pretty to refuse. I love the effort than has gone into designing these covers and the little details in them. This is how book covers should look!
bloodybrilliantbooks:

After a year I’ve finally completed this collection of Harry Potter books. My mum can’t understand why I want two copies of each book but these editions were just too pretty to refuse. I love the effort than has gone into designing these covers and the little details in them. This is how book covers should look!
bloodybrilliantbooks:

After a year I’ve finally completed this collection of Harry Potter books. My mum can’t understand why I want two copies of each book but these editions were just too pretty to refuse. I love the effort than has gone into designing these covers and the little details in them. This is how book covers should look!
bloodybrilliantbooks:

After a year I’ve finally completed this collection of Harry Potter books. My mum can’t understand why I want two copies of each book but these editions were just too pretty to refuse. I love the effort than has gone into designing these covers and the little details in them. This is how book covers should look!
bloodybrilliantbooks:

After a year I’ve finally completed this collection of Harry Potter books. My mum can’t understand why I want two copies of each book but these editions were just too pretty to refuse. I love the effort than has gone into designing these covers and the little details in them. This is how book covers should look!
bloodybrilliantbooks:

After a year I’ve finally completed this collection of Harry Potter books. My mum can’t understand why I want two copies of each book but these editions were just too pretty to refuse. I love the effort than has gone into designing these covers and the little details in them. This is how book covers should look!
+
medievalpoc:

leeandlow submitted to medievalpoc:




The Diversity Gap in the highest grossing science fiction and fantasy films. Sad, right? You can see the full study here.

I highly recommend reading the entire article.
from the infographic:
Among the top 100 domestic grossing films:• only 8% of films star a protagonist of color• of the 8 protagonists of color, all are men; 6 are played by Will Smith and 1 is a cartoon character (Aladdin)• 0% of protagonists are women of color• 0% of protagonists are LGBTQ• 1% of protagonists are people with a disability
+
arcticsirius:

rubee:

what the fuck how is he putting his arm through the cat and it doesn’t even care

It’s common knowledge that cats break physics and are outside of known biology
+
"I hope there’s lesbians"
Me whenever I go somewhere (via manfrado)
+
+
kingandqueenweasley:

Wingardium Leviosa by Ottowl
+

Sweet mother of God.

Sweet mother of God.

Sweet mother of God.

Sweet mother of God.
+
+
homedesigning:

(via More Tasteful Modern Villas)
+
+
malformalady:

 An old tree stump with grass growing over it, Faroe Islands